Juneteenth Forum Highlights Contributions of Black Women Leaders from Civil War Era Onward

UMGC Europe celebrated the Juneteenth holiday with a special online forum that focused on the role of Black women in the fight for civil rights. The presentation was designed, in part, to address what one speaker characterized as the invisibility of the significant work Black women did to further the cause of civil rights both before and after the Civil War. 

Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when a Union general in Texas read the proclamation freeing enslaved people. Black Americans have celebrated the holiday for years, and a number of states have observed it as well. UMGC’s celebration came just as the U.S. Congress voted overwhelmingly to make Juneteenth a national holiday. 

As part of the hour-long program, Juneteenth: Women, Contribution, Evolution, Dr. LaShawn Thompson pointed out how, in American history, the role of Black people has often been obscured, and the contributions of Black women abolitionists in particular were practically invisible. 

“We must ask ourselves why the accomplishments of Black women in the march towards freedom have been hidden away,” said Thompson. “The little-known facts about African Americans in America become no facts at all. African American women are the most invisible of all.” 

And yet, before the Civil War, she said, they worked to keep families together when possible and to provide guidance for resistance, and after the war they became community organizers, despite starting with no formal experience. 

Thompson quotes Anne Scott (1990) author of the journal article Most Invisible of All: Black Women’s Voluntary Association, “How was it that women who had grown up in slavery were able to so quickly organize themselves after emancipation? But move, they did. In one way or another, organized black women touched every area of life, from home to politics.” 

That invisibility has been damaging for Black women, Thompson explained, even as they live with the myth of the strong Black woman who cares for everyone else. 

“It is the root of both physical and mental health disparities in her current existence,” she said and quotes Ward & Heidrich (2009) authors of the journal article African American women’s beliefs about mental illness, stigma, and preferred coping behaviors, “Additionally, negative social and political experiences including racism, discrimination and sexism have put African American women at risk for low-income jobs, multiple roles strain and health problems, all of which are associated with the onset of mental illness.” 

These challenges only underscore the significance of the work being done, and the program celebrated the lives of Black women who emerged to lead the fight against slavery and discrimination, to help educate African Americans and to establish businesses. 

  • Harriet Tubman, who grew up in slavery in Maryland and escaped north to freedom, returned repeatedly to lead slaves to freedom on the Underground Railroad. 
  • Sojourner Truth, who escaped slavery and was the first African American to successfully sue her former owner to win the freedom for her son, went on to become a leading abolitionist and women’s rights activist. 
  • Nannie Helen Burroughs—an educator, orator, religious leader, civil rights activist, feminist and businesswoman—helped establish the National Association of Colored Women in 1896.  In 1909, she founded the National Training School for Women and Girls in Washington, D.C., to help provide opportunities beyond domestic work.
  • Mary McLoud Bethune, who founded Bethune-Cookman College in Florida—which became the standard for other Black colleges and universities—became president of the National Council of Negro Women and fought for Black voter rights. 
  • Dorothy Height, who worked against lynching in the South and worked for voter registration. 
  • Shirley Chisholm, the first African American woman to win a seat in the U.S. Congress, was also the first to run for the Democratic nomination for president in 1972. 
  • Madam C.J. Walker, who became the first female Black millionaire by creating a haircare system for Black women, employed hundreds of Black women through her business, which eventually included hair culture colleges. 
  • Ida B. Wells, who as a journalist attacked Jim Crow policies, fought to expose and combat the practice of lynching after a close friend was killed because he tried to break up a fight between a white boy and a black boy outside his grocery store. Her writings chronicled the struggles of Black people whose stories might have been lost to history without her work. 

Other participants in the program included faculty member Dr. Steven Carter, who provided an introduction;  Genesis Neely, senior traveling academic advisor, who presented “Black Women Through History”; faculty member Janique Parnell, who presented “Hidden in Plain Sight: A Legacy of Greatness”; faculty member Renaldo Walker, who performed a W.E.B Du Bois Reenactment; Pamela Frank, a member of the Diversity Council and a National Test Center coordinator, who presented on Ida B. Wells; Emerald Smith, a member of the Diversity Council and National Test Center coordinator, who read from a poem by Frances E. Harper; and Patricia Jameson, director of Overseas Diversity and Equity Programs, who led the organization of the event and provided closing remarks. 

UMGC Adjunct Faculty Member Shari Fleming, Esq. Named to The Maryland Daily Record’s List of “Leadership in Law Honorees”

Shari Fleming, Esq., principal of the Law Office of Shari Fleming and an adjunct faculty member in the legal studies program at University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC), has been named to The Maryland Daily Record’s list of “Leadership in Law Honorees.”

The list recognizes Maryland’s legal professionals—lawyers and judges—who demonstrate outstanding dedication to their occupation and to their communities. Fleming is one of 10 who made the list in the Generation J.D. category, which recognizes up-and-coming legal professionals.

Shari Fleming, Esq.

“I am both humbled and elated to be recognized by my peers in the legal and business community,” said Fleming. “My practice is enriched by my teaching at UMGC, and I am grateful to use this opportunity to continue to share the importance of advancing the concepts of ownership, wealth maintenance and wealth retention, particularly within communities of color, because Our Legacy Matters.”

Fleming is a business and legal strategist, focused on helping individuals reach their goals. “I believe in the importance of serving with excellence and integrity throughout every business and legal transaction,” said Fleming. “I serve a variety of clients from individuals to businesses, ensuring receipt of high-quality legal representation.”

Fleming earned a B.S. in Science in History and a B.S. in Black Studies, graduating Magna Cum Laude from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. She holds a J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law and is a member of the Maryland Bar. Fleming also has been trained as a court designated mediator of civil disputes and is a licensed real estate broker.

In addition to teaching at UMGC, Fleming is an adjunct at Howard Community College. She has taught courses in business law, business ethics, introduction to law, elder law, child abuse and neglect, healthcare policy, healthcare law and ethics and special education law.

Winners were selected by an outside panel of legal and business leaders. An overall winner of this year’s Leadership in Law Awards will be announced at the online celebration event on June 17. The honoree will be determined by a vote of this year’s Leadership in Law winners.

“This year’s Leadership in Law celebrates the legal professionals who make this state great,” said Suzanne Fischer-Huettner, senior group publisher of The Daily Record. “We honor their excellent work in the profession in addition to their devoted community service and mentoring of the next generation. In addition, the Generation J.D. Award recognizes those in the early stages of their careers, and the Lifetime Achievement Award honors those who have dedicated many years to the profession. We at The Daily Record are pleased to recognize this year’s honorees.”

Winners will be profiled in a special insert in the newspaper’s June 18 issue and on its website.

In addition to Fleming, others in the Generation J.D. category included:

Heather Welch Arbogast, McGuireWoods LLP

Ashleigh J.F. Lynn, Venable LLP

Nicholas R. McDaniels, Lewis McDaniels LLC

Raynna A. Nkwanyuo, O’Donoghue & O’Donoghue

Thomasina Poirot, Venable LLP

Aarti Kaur Sidhu, Disability Rights Maryland

Nicholas Stewart, Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr LLP

Tony William Torain II, Polsinelli P.C.

Nicole K. Whitecar, Miles & Stockbridge P.C.

2021 Lifetime Achievement Honorees

Hon. Andre M. Davis, United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

William J. Murphy, Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

Kenneth Thompson, Venable LLP

William T. “Bill” Wood, Wood Law Offices LLC

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UMGC to Host Military Veterans Virtual Appreciation Fair, May 13

Event to Feature Virtual Booths with Employers and Veteran Service Organizations Along with UMGC Career Services and Veterans Programs Staff 

Adelphi, Md. (April 22, 2021)–University of Maryland Global Campus will host the 4th annual Mil/Vet Appreciation Fair on Thursday, May 13, from 4 to 7 p.m. The fair will be conducted virtually through the VFairs platform and feature virtual booths and a virtual auditorium. The event is open to all military-affiliated students, staff and faculty at UMGC. 

Attendees can visit booths staffed by recruiters from companies around the country and representatives from veteran service organizations, as well as staff from UMGC’s Veterans Initiatives Office (VIO) and Career Services Office. In the virtual auditorium, the university will host a recognition ceremony for the SALUTE National Honor Society inductees and VIO scholarship recipients. 

To register for the event, please visit UMGC Military and Veteran Virtual Appreciation Fair 

“UMGC is committed to providing opportunities and resources to our military and veterans students, and our Military and Veterans Appreciation Fair salutes the men and women who are serving or have served in defense of our nation,” said Dr. Nicole DeRamus-Suazo, the university’s assistant vice president for Veterans Programs. “It is our honor to showcase veterans service organizations and employers who are committed to serving, helping, and employing veterans and their families locally and nationally.”  

As part of UMGC’s alliance with Audacy (formerly Entercom), the media company will showcase the fair through its “Eye on Vets” series on the ConnectingVets.com website. The feature will include interviews at the event with representatives of the veterans service organizations and employers in attendance, as well as members of the university’s career services and veterans initiatives offices. 

More than half of UMGC’s students are military-affiliated, including active-duty servicemembers and their families stationed around the world, reservists, members of the National Guard and veterans. 

About University of Maryland Global Campus 

University of Maryland Global Campus (formerly University of Maryland University College) is a world leader in innovative educational models, with award-winning online programs in disciplines including biotechnology, cybersecurity, data analytics, and information technology that are in high demand in today’s increasingly technical, global workplace. 

With an enrollment of some 90,000 students, UMGC offers open access with a global footprint and a specific mission—to meet the learning needs of students whose responsibilities may include jobs, family, and military service. The university offers both undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs, including doctoral programs. 

A pioneer in distance education since 1947, UMGC today is harnessing the power of learning science and technology to deliver high quality, low cost, accessible higher education. 

In 1949, UMGC became the first institution to send faculty overseas to teach active-duty military personnel at installations in Europe. The university expanded overseas operations to Asia in 1956 and to the Middle East in 2005. UMGC faculty have taught in the war zones of Vietnam, Kosovo, Kuwait, Afghanistan and Iraq. 

UMGC now offers classes to military service personnel and their families at more than 175 locations in more than 20 countries. Today, more than half of the university’s students are active-duty military personnel and their families, reservists, members of the National Guard and veterans. 

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UMGC Expertise Featured Prominently at CyberMaryland 2021

The 2021 CyberMaryland Conference presented by the Federal Business Council (FBC) promoted the theme, “Building the Cyber Generation.” During the two-day conference agenda, University of Maryland Global Campus speakers built on this theme with the intent of ensuring today’s cyber-safety and educating tomorrow’s cybersecurity professionals.

Featuring thought leaders from Maryland’s cybersecurity sector as well as nationally recognized speakers and panelists on cyber and technology innovations, the online event covered the most up-to-date information in all facets of the cyber ecosystem. UMGC faculty members, including several from the School of Cybersecurity and Information Technology, presented on a wide range of topics. Notably they discussed current and future cyber legislation, promoting women in cybersecurity, the emerging field of cyber accounting, and the potential of stackable credentialing.

Additionally, the UMGC student cyber competition team scored a big win by placing first in the four-year university category at the conference’s national capture-the-flag (CTF) competition. This signature event, hosted by UMGC, assembled top national cyber talent competing in an online-virtual competition. The UMGC team, including Tim Nordvedt, Paul Chilcote, Louis Rush and Ben Simcox, scored 91 points to take first place, followed by runner up University of Central Florida with 87 points, and Towson University taking third place with 56 points.

Keeping pace with national and local threats through legislation

On day one of the conference, Greg Von Lehman, special assistant for cybersecurity at UMGC, moderated a panel on recent cybersecurity legislation in Maryland and at the federal level. Von Lehman noted that the number of cybersecurity bills proposed in Congress has climbed steadily in recent years as have bills in state legislatures.

“We will be seeing a greater impact of the government’s role in the nation’s cybersecurity,” said Von Lehman. “From 2016 to 2020, we saw that COVID-19 impacted the number of cybersecurity bills that passed, and we should see more passed in 2022.”

Panelists, including Michael Garcia, senior policy advisor at ThirdWay, and Markus Rauschecker, cybersecurity program director at the University of Maryland Center for Health & Homeland Security (CHHS), explored the victories for cybersecurity in the last Congress, the range of cybersecurity issues that state legislatures are seeking to address, and the cybersecurity bills that are currently moving through the Maryland General Assembly.

Garcia added that the 116th Congress has increased the amount of cyber legislation, which is also gaining bipartisan support. “Although going after adversaries is not a key priority thus far, there has been a lot of pressure on members of congress to act after the SolarWinds attacks,” he said.

Von Lehman offered a summary of legislation, stating that most bills introduced and passed on the national level focused on three primary areas—election security, criminality and consumer protection. For election security, 14 best practice bills were introduced out of 35 total and four were passed. Criminality bills focused on increasing penalties, identifying new crimes, and increasing investigative capacity for cybercrimes. Most consumer protection bills introduced focused on security requirements, such as data protection and personal information. In this area, 33 bills were introduced and three passed.

Von Lehman added that legislation in Maryland reflects what is happening on the national stage. “There are 18 cyber-related bills in the current Maryland session focusing on criminal law, consumer protection, preparedness, governance, education and workforce development, and voting security,” he said.

Supporting women in cyber education

A day-one afternoon keynote panel on women in cyber education featured Loyce Pailen, senior director for the Center for Security Studies at UMGC and focused on how public and private organizations can work together to bring more cybersecurity education and employment opportunities to women in their local communities and nationwide.

While cybersecurity jobs are at an all‐time high, she said the gender gap in the field remains wide. The panel discussed ways to build awareness and interest in cyber careers among women of all ages. Pailen stressed the importance of role models. “Girls need to see people like them in the jobs they aspire to attain,” she said. “Rather than introducing girls to cyber, we should be asking them what it is they want to solve in life,” she added.

Also on the panel was 14-year-old Bianca Lewis, otherwise known as “BiaSciLab,” founder of Girls Who Hack, which teaches girls hacking skills so that they can change the future. Asked what educators can do to get girls engaged in cybersecurity, Lewis said, “Kids love anything hands on, so I think that if we want my generation to get into STEAM, we need to teach them hands on projects.”

Panelist Jennifer Wood, head of communications and government affairs at Luta Security, offered a messaging perspective for promoting women in cyber. “We need to change the messages that women are hearing,” she said. “Girls need to see all these women featured as cyber experts and understand that they can have that role as well.” Wood also said that local companies are lagging in terms of engagement. “They need to do a better job engaging in local events and getting involved in the schools to make sure there are increased opportunities in K-12 and beyond.”

Meeting the need for cybersecurity training in the accounting field

As guardians of crucial assets—while not typically thought of as cybersecurity professionals—accountants now play a critical role in cybersecurity and digital forensics. A UMGC panel of four faculty members discussed the impetus to develop a master-level CyberAccounting program, including the expanded role of lawyers and CPAs in cybersecurity.

Accounting firms are treasure troves of information. To hackers, they are targets. And although CPAs are not cyber experts, they do need to know when to engage cyber professionals. They need to understand the risk landscape, how to detect intrusions into assets, how to promote cyber resilience, and how to foster conversations among stakeholders.

Key to cyber accounting, according to Bruce DeGrazia, professor of Cybersecurity Management and Policy, is an understanding of Blockchain. “Leaders in accounting need to understand Blockchain, not because it is the basis for crypto currencies, but because it can be used to protect documents and transactions,” he said. “Blockchain in financial institutions allows us to protect documents and confidentiality.”

DeGrazia also made the case that the CPA skillset is a natural fit for cyber audits. “CPAs are expert in audits and are able to identify cyber risks and assess the severity of each one,” he said. “They are good at auditing security policies and privacy controls, they can perform penetration testing on the social engineering side of cybersecurity, and they can integrate cyber risks into the audit plan.”

Positioning learners for academic and career success with microcredentials

Douglas Harrison, vice president and dean of the UMGC School of Cybersecurity and Information Technology, moderated a session on stackable microcredentials and how providing professionals with right-sized industry-aligned credentials that can be assembled (stacked) toward traditional degrees are increasingly valued in the workplace.

“Students can assemble a series of credentials–certificates, licenses, badges, or apprenticeships–that recognize achievements and abilities,” said Harrison. “This increases their currency in our knowledge economy, creating more direct pathways to better jobs and higher wages.”

Why stackable? The high cost of education and immediate relevancy are two driving factors to incremental learning. “There is a theory that supports learning in smaller bites,” said Harrison. There is also a motivational aspect. Harrison noted that adults also sense value upon completion if learning is done incrementally and in smaller amounts. Moreover, by stacking education into small units of learning, students are afforded the flexibility of coming in and out of learning. Ed Bach, vice president, Strategic Partnerships at UMGC, discussed the business case for stackables from an employer perspective. “Corporations are looking for knowledge now,” he said. “Stackables help us produce focused, well-educated employees for employers, while encouraging life-long learning.

In Journal of Literacy and Technology Article, 10 UMGC Administrators, Faculty Members, Show How to Help Students Successfully Transition to Online Learning

As the Covid-19 pandemic has forced colleges and universities to shift face-to-face instruction to online and hybrid classes, University of Maryland Global Campus is offering ways to help institutions unaccustomed to online teaching support students and faculty transitioning to a virtual learning environment.Continue Reading

Freedman Leads National Press Club Through Pandemic, Protests, and Politics

For more than 112 years, the National Press Club has been the center of news in Washington as the nation endured two world wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, civil unrest and terrorist attacks. Its doors were always open to journalists and news sources.

And that is how Mike Freedman expected it to be when he assumed his one-year term as National Press Club president in January 2020. Freedman, the senior vice president and journalist in residence at University of Maryland Global Campus, was looking forward to capping his journalism career with UPI and CBS Radio News with an active year similar to those of his 112 predecessors.Continue Reading

On Her First Try: UMGC Alumna Scores Better Than 95 Percent on CPA Exam, Proves Practice Makes Near Perfect

Renee Cordero could be an excellent source for accounting advice.

The University of Maryland Global Campus 2018 graduate was named a winner of the 2019 Elijah Watt Sells Award given by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants for those who excel at taking the CPA Exam.

Of the 75,000 people who took the exam, Cordero was one of only 133 who scored a 95.5 on all four of the exam sections, all on the first try of taking them.Continue Reading

Prince George’s County Executive Alsobrooks Commends UMGC’s New Class of Leaders at 2020 Winter Commencement

“I’m not just addressing graduates, I’m addressing a class of leaders,” Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks told University of Maryland Global Campus degree recipients in a commencement address delivered via video during the university’s 2020 virtual winter commencement program, which launched Saturday, Dec. 19.Continue Reading

UMGC Cyber Experts Predict Rise in Attacks on Software, Cloud and Critical Infrastructure in the Year Ahead

What a year 2020 has been. The Covid-19 pandemic has had an impact on our lives in so many ways—how we work, conduct business, socialize, learn and simply go about our daily routines.Continue Reading

UMGC’s Simonsen Tells Maryland House Panel of Ways to Combat “COVID Slide” in Schools

Closing schools during the coronavirus pandemic has exposed inequities in the education system that need to be fixed even after students return to the classrooms, University of Maryland Global Campus Education Program Director Monica Simonsen, Ph.D., told Maryland House Ways and Means subcommittee members at a Nov. 19 hearing.Continue Reading