University of Maryland Global Campus Taps MJ Bishop to Lead New Integrative Learning Design Unit

Nationally Recognized Scholar Joins UMGC After Leading University System of Maryland’s 
William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation 

Adelphi, Md. (May 13, 2022)—University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) has announced that MJ Bishop, Ed.D., a nationally recognized scholar and leader in the design and evaluation of effective learning environments, has been named vice president of the university’s new Integrative Learning Design unit. Dr. Bishop began her new role on April 25. 

“Dr. Bishop brings three decades of experience in learning design and an established record of impact and success to UMGC,” said Blakely Pomietto, UMGC senior vice president and chief academic officer. “She has experience both in the design and evaluation of optimally effective learning environments as well as in supporting postsecondary institutions and their faculty as they explore and adopt academic innovations aimed at improving access, affordability, and achievement for students.” 

Dr. Bishop will play a significant role in continuing UMGC’s shift to a more collaborative and holistic approach to defining, designing, and solutioning for a range of learning and learner experiences. She has a long history of collaboration with UMGC and a broad and deep understanding of the institution and the higher education landscape.  

“I am excited and honored to be leading this new unit, which will bring together UMGC’s faculty, students, learning design professionals, assessment experts, and data analysts through a collaborative design process that signifies an exciting change in how we operate and what we are offering our students,” said Bishop. “We are combining the best of what we know from subject-matter experts, the learning sciences, design research, data analytics, and the affordances of emerging technologies to create and continuously improve online courses and programs.” 

In 2013, Dr. Bishop joined the University System of Maryland (USM) Office of Academic and Student Affairs as the inaugural director of the William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation, subsequently serving as assistant and later associate vice chancellor and introducing new ways of thinking about student success, equity, and inclusion across the 12 USM institutions.  

Dr. Bishop began her academic career at Lehigh University’s College of Education, where she taught for 13 years in the graduate Learning Sciences and Technology program, while exploring how cognitive processing, motivation, affect, aesthetics, group structure, communication, and systems theories inform our understanding of instructional message design and research on best design practice. 

Dr. Bishop graduated from Lebanon Valley College with a bachelor’s degree in political science and English and holds a master’s degree in English from Millersville University and a doctorate in instructional design and development from Lehigh University. 

About University of Maryland Global Campus 

Currently celebrating its 75th anniversary, University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) was established in 1947 to serve adults in the workforce and the military. Today, UMGC enrolls some 90,000 students annually, offering bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs, as well as certificates in more than 90 fully online and hybrid programs and specializations.   

UMGC has a long history of innovation in reaching students where they are, including as a pioneer of internet instruction, piloting its first online classes in 1994. The university has received numerous awards for its groundbreaking work in developing fully online degree programs, including in high-demand fields such as cybersecurity, business, data analytics, health care and education.  

UMGC now offers classes to military service personnel and their families at some 180 locations in more than 20 countries. More than half of the university’s students are active-duty military personnel, their families, members of the National Guard and veterans. 

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University of Maryland Global Campus’s Innovative In-Person “Grad Walk” to Recognize More Than 3,600 Graduates from Classes of 2020, 2021 and 2022, May 16-22

Some 1,700 Graduates from the Classes of 2020 and 2021 to Return for Recognition

University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) has announced Spring Grad Walk 2022, an innovative in-person and online experience designed to accommodate thousands of graduates and guests while protecting the health and safety of the university community.  

The UMGC Class of 2022 will be joined by graduates from the classes of 2020 and 2021 the week of May 16–22 for the university’s first in-person graduation celebration in more than two years. More than 3,600 graduates have registered to attend, including some 1,700 from the classes of 2020 and 2021.  

The event will take place at the College Park Marriott Hotel and Conference Center, with graduates selecting from multiple time slots to cross the stage and receive individual recognition.  

Special features of Spring Grad Walk 2022 include:  

  • Each graduate’s name will be called as they cross a formal commencement stage in regalia  
      
  • Family members and friends can cheer their graduate from a viewing area directly in front of the stage  
      
  • Professional photographers will be on site to take photos as each graduate crosses the stage, along with individual and group photos before and after recognition  
      
  • Each graduate will receive a video clip of themselves crossing the stage to keep as a memento and share online  
      
  • Graduates may take photos and selfies on UMGC’s beautiful grounds and at photo stations decorated with the colors of UMGC and the state of Maryland  
      
  • Graduates can commemorate their achievements with family and friends in a special Celebration Zone, where they can meet UMGC faculty, staff, and Alumni Association representatives and purchase UMGC Alumni apparel, gear and other mementos.  

Since the start of the pandemic in early 2020, UMGC has conducted its commencements online to help protect the health and safety of students, guests, faculty, and staff. This year, a special website has been created for the Class of 2022 that includes an on-demand ceremony with presentations by speakers, the formal conferral of degrees by UMGC President Gregory Fowler, a keynote address from UMGC alumna Ginger Miller, and an online “Gallery of Graduates” showcasing graduates’ personalized recognition slides that can be shared via social media or e-mail.  

Graduates in the Class of 2022 have received a mailed Grad Pack containing UMGC ‘swag’ to help jump-start the festivities. They are encouraged to share their achievements with fellow graduates via social media using #UMGCGrad.  

A profile of the UMGC FY2022 graduates: 

  • Number of graduates: 13,685 
  • Average age: 35 
  • Oldest graduate: 78 
  • Youngest graduate: 19 
  • Graduates come from all 50 states, four U.S territories and 20 countries 
  • Degrees awarded: 
  • Associate: 2,426 
  • Bachelor’s: 7,278 
  • Master’s: 3,980  
  • Doctorate: 34 

UMGC also conducts graduation ceremonies for military servicemembers and dependents overseas in Germany, Japan, Korea and Guam.  

About University of Maryland Global Campus 

Currently celebrating its 75th anniversary, University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) was established in 1947 to serve adults in the workforce and the military. Today, UMGC enrolls some 90,000 students annually, offering bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs, as well as certificates in more than 90 fully online and hybrid programs and specializations.   

UMGC has a long history of innovation in reaching students where they are, including as a pioneer of internet instruction, piloting its first online classes in 1994. The university has received numerous awards for its groundbreaking work in developing fully online degree programs, including in high-demand fields such as cybersecurity, business, data analytics, health care and education.  

UMGC now offers classes to military service personnel and their families at some 180 locations in more than 20 countries. More than half of the university’s students are active-duty military personnel, their families, members of the National Guard and veterans. 

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UMGC Mentors Share Their Career-Shaping Wisdom to Help Others

A mentor has the power to make a life-changing difference in someone else’s career. In recognition of National Mentoring Month this January, mentors in UMGC’s alumni career mentors program share insights about how they use their time and talent to help others reach their professional goals.  

“Mentoring has the potential to make a huge impact on up-and-coming professionals, which is why the university offers, Community Connect,” the increasingly popular mentor program, says Nikki Sandoval, associate vice president of alumni relations. “We’re so grateful to our talented and generous alumni who give so selflessly to help other professionals get ahead.” 

Here’s some key advice from some of UMGC’s alumni career mentors:  

Dr. Catherine Pearson ‘11 
Business and Management PAS, MBA 

Why do you mentor?  
When I contribute to the development of mentees to become more innovative thinkers, they can reframe their own experiences. They can consciously make informed decisions about their careers. When mentees accomplish their goals, I feel honored to celebrate with them. 

What’s your best advice for up-and-coming professionals?  
When choosing a career path, don’t be afraid to step out into an uncomfortable environment and experiment. Use LinkedIn or other social media platforms to leverage your research. Seek out professionals who currently hold the job title within the industry you want to pursue. Learning directly from professionals in your field will impact the direction of your career. Request a 15-minute phone call followed by a visit to the organization or a virtual orientation.  

Ask questions about the day-to-day demands of the job. Find out if your skills fit into the job or industry. Build on your skills and strengthen other areas. Be open to exploring opportunities that contribute to your desires of where you want to be in your career. Getting there may require change. Have a mindset of flexibility and implement the needed changes to get you there.  

Find a mentor with the experience and accomplishments that will most support you during your journey. Be sure the mentor’s values align with your values—filter on the importance of integrity. Engage and invest your time in getting to know your mentor. Demonstrate your potential by action. Follow up and share your progress, clarify what you want, and determine if they are a good fit to help you move from where you are to where you want to be. Cultivate the relationship  before  you ask them to be your mentor.   

How can a mentor help students who are just starting out?  
As mentors, we have to be careful not to assume that students have the same desires as we do, even though they may pursue the same career. Challenge students to maximize their potential in discovering their passion and where they fit into the world. Help them explore opportunities by providing resources and introducing them to partnering networks. Be that champion for them. Celebrate their successes to let them know they have support.  

What are some of the benefits of mentoring?  
As a mentor, I connect with mentees and build trust. They have a safe space to share their concerns, worries and personal life decisions that may affect their careers. Creating a safe space fosters a culture of growth and leadership for mentees. Mentoring helps stretch me, further develop as a leader and gain new insights into generational differences. 

What key lesson have you learned during your career? 
Challenges create growth and development opportunities. The bigger the challenge is, the stronger we become if we remain steadfast as we work through those challenging opportunities. 

Aisha Summers ’16 and ‘19 
Bachelor of Science in Laboratory Management, Master of Science in Biotech-Regulatory Affairs 

Why do you mentor? 

Mentoring is one of the ways I give back. Personally, I didn’t have much luck with mentorship when I began my professional career. I had to seek out most of the information I yearned for by reading career-advice blogs and then make sense of it all on my own. My hope is to be a source of information and support system to someone else that needs it.  

Most importantly, representation matters. I mentor so that someone else sees the reflection of a woman of color, mother, wife and person with dyslexia navigate a successful career.  

What’s your best advice for up-and-coming professionals? 
Invest in yourself by keeping your resume up to date. You never know when you’ll need it to justify a promotion or entertain a new position.  

Avoid becoming complacent. Take on new challenges by volunteering for a task or project at work. This is how we grow as professionals and gain expertise in our industry or profession.  

How can a mentor help students who are just starting out? 
Students just starting out have a lot of questions and many times are overwhelmed or feel uncertain about what is next for them. The biggest help a mentor can provide a student who is just starting out is to be supportive and encouraging,  

What are some of the benefits of mentoring? 
Mentoring is a pathway to new professional relationships. A mentee can become a professional colleague. I love seeing a text or email from a mentee who wants to share a new achievement or success.  

What key lesson have you learned during your career? 
Eventually I learned to reduce stress and burnout. I bought a planner specifically for work. It helped me take notes in meetings, prioritize my tasks and better communicate my workload with my leadership. 

I have also learned that any position I hold needs to be mutually beneficial to the organization I work for and to myself. My advice is do not stay in any position that is not providing you an opportunity to grow personally and/or professionally. 

David Austin ’17 and ’20  
Master of Science in Cybersecurity Policy, MBA  

Why do you mentor?  
I mentor with the hope I can inspire other people that they are capable of doing anything they really see in their hearts and minds.  

What’s your best advice for up-and-coming professionals?  
Have an open mind and be flexible. Most importantly, be prepared. There is no easy road in terms of paying your dues. The younger that you are, the more opportunities that come your way. Really be prepared to make sacrifices.  

What are some of the benefits of mentoring? 
The biggest benefit to mentees is that they start getting different ideas. I mention different ideas and different paths they may never have thought of before. I think that’s what’s helpful. 


What key lesson have you learned during your career?  
The one thing I learned from a security information perspective is that in in other businesses, we are taught to take the initiative and not ask permission to do things. That’s fine, but in cybersecurity, I learned that you have to ask permission. You have to work as a team.  

Esther Ndungu ‘15 
Bachelor of Science in Gerontology & Aging and Psychology 

Why do you mentor? 
As a military spouse and mother of two boys, attending school was an endeavor I did to better myself and to expand my knowledge on different subjects. I had a great learning experience while attending school at UMGC, so mentorship is my way of giving back to the school and a way to guide the current students to achieve their academic goals.  

What’s your best advice for up-and-coming professionals? 
I would advise an upcoming professional to choose a career that is in line with their hobbies. They will be motivated and excited whenever they engage in work that they enjoy. 

How can a mentor help students who are just starting out? 
I did not have a mentor when I started college, and because of this, I made so many mistakes along the way by trying out everything. It became overwhelming, and at some point, I did not have the motivation to continue pursuing my educational endeavors. Guiding students who are just starting out to create practical schedules is essential in ensuring that they have enough time allocated to attend to personal matters, as well as staying active in school.  

What are some of the benefits of mentoring? 
Mentorship is like having VIP access to specialized information that would help one advance faster. The mentee gets to avoid some pitfalls because they can leverage both good and bad experiences from others, enabling them to implement aggressive strategies to their goals. 

What key lesson have you learned during your career? 

Over the cause of my career, I have come to learn the value of properly picking out electives in school and the importance of strategic partnering, or networking. In general, these present unique opportunities to expand an individual’s scope and enhance necessary skills for future growth and success. 

Keith Gruenberg ‘94 
Bachelor of Science in Management Studies 

Why do you mentor? 
I enjoy encouraging others and providing guidance and alignment to help them navigate an ever-changing world. I remember transitioning out of the military and all the unknowns and trying to work through all the challenges on my own. I’m hoping my mentoring helps reduce challenges and anxiety and results in each person taking a giant step forward in his or her career.     

What’s your best advice for up-and-coming professionals? 
Know what you are looking for or at least what gets you excited and network, network, network. There are many options out there, but you can speed up the process by knowing what you are looking for and what are your must-haves for a company. Building a broad network will hopefully get you introduced deeper into a great company with a great fit.   

How can a mentor help students who are just starting out? 
When a student is just starting out is the perfect time to connect with a mentor. A mentor can provide assistance on navigating college courses and aligning that to a potential career aspiration. Connecting with a mentor from the start allows you to build a relationship and grow with the student as they work through key education and employment decisions.   

What are some of the benefits of mentoring? 
Mentoring keeps me connected to the new workforce and keeps me connected with current trends in business. I want to be as prepared as possible to provide great support and guidance based on the current business situation. It also helps me to understand the concerns and focus for students getting ready to join the workforce. I feel like I’m making a difference and giving back.   

What key lesson have you learned during your career? 
Nothing comes easy in the real world. You have to want it and work for it to make it happen. If you don’t get it, pick yourself up, determine where you need to improve and try again. Persistence and tenacity are your friends.   

Interested in mentoring through UMGC’s Career Connect program? 
If you’re looking for a mentor or would like to sign up to become a mentor, visit careerquest.umgc.edu to learn more about UMGC Career Services and to register to participate in the Community Connect program. To speak with someone directly about the program, contact communityconnect@umgc.edu.

Read more UMGC Alumni News

University of Maryland Global Campus Joins Wiley’s Extended Learning Network

UMGC will now offer degrees for Wiley Beyond’s Network of 80 Companies and 500,000 Employees 

Adelphi, Md. (Jan. 11, 2022)—University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC), a pioneer in providing innovative and quality academic degree programs for adult and underserved populations, has joined Wiley, a global leader in research and education, in an alliance that adds UMGC to Wiley’s Extended Learning Network. This network includes 57 partner schools that support degrees and reskilling programs through Wiley Beyond, the company’s tuition benefits solution, and the 80 companies and 500,000 employees currently partnered with Wiley Beyond will have access to UMGC’s more than 90 fully online degree programs and specializations.   

As part of this agreement, UMGC will work with Wiley and workforce development agencies around the country, as well as with community colleges that are seeking more efficient access to bachelor’s degree programs.   

“We are pleased and proud to partner with Wiley to develop a more skilled workforce,” said UMGC President Gregory Fowler. “Our experience with establishing transfer relationships with community colleges will benefit the participants in Wiley Beyond and increase the pipeline of students who are completing bachelor’s degree.” 

“Through Wiley Beyond, Wiley offers one of the most extensive learning networks for employer-sponsored education programs,” said Todd Zipper, president of Wiley Education Services. “We’re excited to add University of Maryland Global Campus to our learning network to provide more learners with affordable, accessible and outcomes-driven education.”   

UMGC enrolls more than 90,000 students each year, more than half of whom are active-duty military personnel and their families stationed on military bases around the world.  

The university also offers award-winning online programs in disciplines including biotechnology, cybersecurity, data analytics and information technology that are in high demand in today’s increasingly technical, global workplace. UMGC also offers cost savings through its use of digital resources, which have replaced costly publisher textbooks in most courses.  

About University of Maryland Global Campus 

Celebrating its 75th anniversary, University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) was established in 1947 to serve adult students outside the traditional campus, including military servicemembers and veterans. Today, UMGC enrolls some 90,000 students annually, offering bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs, as well as certificates in more than 90 fully online programs and specializations.
 
UMGC was the first university to send faculty overseas to teach active-duty military personnel at installations in Europe, beginning in 1949, expanding to Asia in 1956 and to the Middle East in 2005. UMGC faculty have taught in the war zones of Vietnam, Kosovo, Kuwait, Afghanistan and Iraq.   

UMGC now offers classes to military service personnel and their families at more than 175 locations in more than 20 countries. More than half of the university’s student body are active-duty military personnel and their families, members of the National Guard and veterans.  

About Wiley

Wiley empowers researchers, learners, universities, and corporations to achieve their goals in an ever-changing world.

For over 200 years we have been helping people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. We develop digital education, learning, assessment, and certification solutions to help universities, businesses, and individuals move between education and employment and achieve their ambitions. By partnering with learned societies, we support researchers to communicate discoveries that make a difference. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, books, and other digital content build on a 200-year heritage of quality publishing.

UMGC’s Maryland Theta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu Stands Out at Triennial Convention 

University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) students, alumni and faculty from the Maryland Theta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu (PGM) received multiple accolades at the international honor society of social sciences’ Triennial Convention. 

The Maryland Theta Chapter was honored with the Joseph B. James Chapter Incentive Award at the convention, which was held virtually in November. The award is presented every three years and recognizes a chapter that excels in its membership or activities. Maryland Theta was recognized as a Top 10 Chapter for recruiting 183 members in 2021.

The chapter also received the Roll of Distinction, Pi Gamma Mu’s highest chapter honor, for the third year in a row.

“I think the PGM convention was important for UMGC because it highlighted the excellence of our students as scholars and leaders on an international stage,” said Katherine Im, faculty co-sponsor and program director of behavioral sciences and gerontology at UMGC.

“Since UMGC doesn’t have a traditional campus, it can be difficult to find opportunities for our students to stand out, but the PGM convention demonstrated that our students are eager to showcase and develop their talents beyond the classroom,” she added.

Im along with Emma Bate, UMGC program director of social sciences, are co-sponsors of Maryland Theta Chapter’s of PGM. 

Two UMGC alumni and one student shared their papers with an international audience of social science scholars during the convention. The presenters and their papers were:

  • Margareth Ojetola-Mead ’20, “Cognitive Impairments and Online Learning”
  • Jessica Dassler ’18, “Women in Literature: The Impact of Feminism on Fantasy Literature, 1950-1990”
  • Cynthia Glynn-Dindial, “Vivekānanda and Nivedita as Ardhanārīśvara: Why an Indian Svami Chose an Irishwoman as His Lioness”

Both Dassler and Glynn-Dindial received special recognition for Top 10 Papers, making them eligible for publication in the International Social Science Review. Dassler’s paper will appear in the review in December, and Glynn-Dindial will submit her work for publication next year.

“The students who represented Maryland Theta Chapter did an excellent job of raising the visibility of the social science programs at UMGC,” Im said.

During the Poster Session at the convention, Im offered an overview of the chapter’s annual social science essay. As the society’s Northeast Regional chancellor, Im was elected to a three-year term as Pi Gamma Mu’s first vice-president. In addition, Melissa Riggs ’22, a UMGC psychology major, was elected Pi Gamma Mu student trustee and will join Im on the national organization’s board of trustees.

“Being a member of Maryland Theta is a legacy, a distinction and an honor. I am very proud to stand among the brightest minds in the social sciences here at UMGC,” Riggs said.

Through the Pi Gamma Mu Leadership Development Institute, UMGC undergraduate students Courtney Peasley and Bethany Hanford completed a seven-hour program focusing on leadership in the social sciences. Peasley and Hanford learned about leadership in literature, under special circumstances and in academia. Maryland Theta Chapter of PGM sponsored the students.

“It meant I had the opportunity to learn from some of the most accomplished alumni in Pi Gamma Mu and at UMGC,” Peasley ’22 said when describing what the convention meant to her.

University of Maryland Global Campus Cancels Winter Commencement Ceremonies Scheduled for December 18

Decision to Cancel In-Person Event Was Made as a Result of Fast-Spreading COVID-19 Variants and to Protect Health and Safety of Graduates, Guests, Faculty and Staff 

An Estimated 10,000 People Were Expected to Attend Ceremonies at Xfinity Center in College Park, Md. 

Adelphi, Md. (Dec. 16, 2021) — Due to the rapid spread of COVID-19 variants and out of an abundance of caution for the health and safety of graduates and guests, as well as that of faculty, staff and event personnel, University of Maryland Global Campus has cancelled its winter commencement ceremonies scheduled for Saturday, December 18, at Xfinity Center in College Park, Md. 

An estimated total of 10,000 people—including graduates, guests and staff—were expected to attend two separate ceremonies at Xfinity Center. 

In a message to the UMGC community, President Gregory W. Fowler said: “We recognize that many institutions are wrestling with decisions of this nature, balancing the desire to host in-person events with the larger responsibility of protecting our communities, and it is in that spirit that we have taken this step. 

“We celebrate the accomplishments of every graduate, and we are heartbroken that we cannot celebrate with them in person,” Fowler continued. “Rest assured that every graduate will be invited back to participate in an in-person ceremony in the future, when conditions allow.” 

Graduates have been invited to visit a virtual recognition gallery after 8 a.m. Eastern time on December 18 to view a special commencement message and to visit the personalized recognition slides honoring UMGC’s more than 7,000 graduates. 

In the state of Maryland there have been 1,866 new COVID cases reported in the past 24 hours, increasing the total number of cases in the state to 592,679, according to the Maryland Department of Health’s COVID-19 Data Dashboard. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, positive cases of the Omicron variant will likely spread faster than the original strain of the virus and have now been detected in 36 states, including Maryland. The first case in the U.S. was identified on December 1.

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UMGC President Gregory W. Fowler Named to The Daily Record’s Inaugural Power 30 Higher Education List

The Daily Record, Maryland’s influential newspaper for business, legal and government leaders, has named UMGC President Gregory W. Fowler to its inaugural Power 30 Higher Education List

According to the newspaper’s announcement, “There are few, if any, fields of endeavor more critical to Maryland’s future than higher education. The task of preparing a new generation of citizens with critical thinking abilities, the temperament for lifelong learning and the skills to enter a globally competitive workplace grows more challenging every year. 

“On top of all of that, we saw year two of a global pandemic that made in-class instruction difficult (sometimes impossible) and posed financial and technological obstacles unthinkable only months earlier. Many of the women and men leading our institutions of higher education, as well as teachers, policymakers and advocates, rose to this challenge.” 

Fowler became UMGC’s seventh president in January 2021, continuing a distinguished 25-year career in higher education that has included transformative leadership roles at Western Governors University and Southern New Hampshire University. 
 
In the newspaper’s Power 30 Higher Ed profile of Fowler, he reflected on his role in leading the nation’s largest online public university. 

“UMGC has a 75-year history of serving adult and military learners beyond the boundaries of the traditional campus on all seven continents,” said Fowler. “I am excited to continue expanding on that mission and tradition. Our team is bringing new levels of deliberate design and transparency to learning experiences—credit and noncredit — that address the needs of new markets with high levels of support and accountability.” 

This list was selected by the newspaper’s editorial team, which also received input from readers. Editors examined how these leaders view the higher education landscape, how it now exists and what it may look like in the future, and exploring the kind of people they are, what drives them to excel and to serve. 

Fowler was asked by the newspaper to reflect on how he had been affected personally by the pandemic. 
 
“COVID-19 started shutting things down just as the Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd cases hit the news.” Fowler said. “I grew up attending high school events not far from where Arbery was killed. That could have been me. 

“Isolation gave me a chance to reflect on what mattered,” Fowler continued, “including my relationships with others and theirs with me, especially anytime someone close to me contracted COVID, and certainly when someone passed away. Both personally and professionally, I have a greater sense of self and purpose now and, to paraphrase Mandela, want even more to use education of the underserved to change the world.” 

About University of Maryland Global Campus 

Celebrating its 75th Anniversary in 2022, University of Maryland Global Campus is a world leader in innovative educational models with award-winning online programs in biotechnology, cybersecurity, data analytics, information technology, and other high-demand disciplines in today’s increasingly technical, global workplace. With an enrollment of some 90,000 students, UMGC offers open access with a global footprint and a specific mission—to meet the learning needs of students whose responsibilities may include jobs, family, and military service. The university offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees and certificate programs, including doctoral programs. A pioneer in distance education since 1947, UMGC is harnessing the power of learning science and technology to deliver accessible high quality, low-cost higher education. 

UMGC Adjunct Faculty Member Shari Fleming, Esq. Named to The Maryland Daily Record’s List of “Leadership in Law Honorees”

Shari Fleming, Esq., principal of the Law Office of Shari Fleming and an adjunct faculty member in the legal studies program at University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC), has been named to The Maryland Daily Record’s list of “Leadership in Law Honorees.”

The list recognizes Maryland’s legal professionals—lawyers and judges—who demonstrate outstanding dedication to their occupation and to their communities. Fleming is one of 10 who made the list in the Generation J.D. category, which recognizes up-and-coming legal professionals.

Shari Fleming, Esq.

“I am both humbled and elated to be recognized by my peers in the legal and business community,” said Fleming. “My practice is enriched by my teaching at UMGC, and I am grateful to use this opportunity to continue to share the importance of advancing the concepts of ownership, wealth maintenance and wealth retention, particularly within communities of color, because Our Legacy Matters.”

Fleming is a business and legal strategist, focused on helping individuals reach their goals. “I believe in the importance of serving with excellence and integrity throughout every business and legal transaction,” said Fleming. “I serve a variety of clients from individuals to businesses, ensuring receipt of high-quality legal representation.”

Fleming earned a B.S. in Science in History and a B.S. in Black Studies, graduating Magna Cum Laude from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. She holds a J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law and is a member of the Maryland Bar. Fleming also has been trained as a court designated mediator of civil disputes and is a licensed real estate broker.

In addition to teaching at UMGC, Fleming is an adjunct at Howard Community College. She has taught courses in business law, business ethics, introduction to law, elder law, child abuse and neglect, healthcare policy, healthcare law and ethics and special education law.

Winners were selected by an outside panel of legal and business leaders. An overall winner of this year’s Leadership in Law Awards will be announced at the online celebration event on June 17. The honoree will be determined by a vote of this year’s Leadership in Law winners.

“This year’s Leadership in Law celebrates the legal professionals who make this state great,” said Suzanne Fischer-Huettner, senior group publisher of The Daily Record. “We honor their excellent work in the profession in addition to their devoted community service and mentoring of the next generation. In addition, the Generation J.D. Award recognizes those in the early stages of their careers, and the Lifetime Achievement Award honors those who have dedicated many years to the profession. We at The Daily Record are pleased to recognize this year’s honorees.”

Winners will be profiled in a special insert in the newspaper’s June 18 issue and on its website.

In addition to Fleming, others in the Generation J.D. category included:

Heather Welch Arbogast, McGuireWoods LLP

Ashleigh J.F. Lynn, Venable LLP

Nicholas R. McDaniels, Lewis McDaniels LLC

Raynna A. Nkwanyuo, O’Donoghue & O’Donoghue

Thomasina Poirot, Venable LLP

Aarti Kaur Sidhu, Disability Rights Maryland

Nicholas Stewart, Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr LLP

Tony William Torain II, Polsinelli P.C.

Nicole K. Whitecar, Miles & Stockbridge P.C.

2021 Lifetime Achievement Honorees

Hon. Andre M. Davis, United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

William J. Murphy, Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

Kenneth Thompson, Venable LLP

William T. “Bill” Wood, Wood Law Offices LLC

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